EPI LIFE COACH articles

Calcium is the most common mineral in the human body. About 99% of the calcium in the body is found in bones and teeth, while the other 1% is found in the blood and soft tissue.
YEAR 2017
DATE Friday, March 03
TOPIC Minerals
AUTHOR Dr. Carlos Orozco  (BSc, MSc, ND, MD, PhD, FPAMS)

Calcium is the most common mineral in the human body. About 99% of the calcium in the body is found in bones and teeth, while the other 1% is found in the blood and soft tissue. Calcium levels in the blood and fluid surrounding the cells (extracellular fluid) must be maintained within a very narrow concentration range for normal physiological functioning. The physiological functions of calcium are so vital to survival that the body will demineralize bone to maintain normal blood calcium levels when calcium intake is inadequate. Thus, adequate dietary calcium is a critical factor in maintaining a healthy skeleton.

Biological Function
-Structure
Calcium is a major structural element in bones and teeth. The mineral component of bone consists mainly of hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] crystals, which contain large amounts of calcium and phosphate (2). Bone is a dynamic tissue that is remodeled throughout life. Bone cells called osteoclasts begin the process of remodeling by dissolving or resorbing bone. Bone-forming cells called osteoblasts then synthesize new bone to replace the bone that was resorbed. During normal growth, bone formation exceeds bone resorption. Osteoporosis may result when bone resorption exceeds formation.

Cell signaling
Calcium plays a role in mediating the constriction and relaxation of blood vessels (vasoconstriction and vasodilation), nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and the secretion of hormones, such as insulin (3)Excitable cells, such as skeletal muscle and nerve cells, contain voltage-dependent calcium channels in their cell membranes that allow for rapid changes in calcium concentrations. For example, when a muscle fiber receives a nerve impulse that stimulates it to contract, calcium channels in the cell membrane open to allow a few calcium ions into the muscle cell. These calcium ions bind to activator proteins within the cell that release a flood of calcium ions from storage vesicles inside the cell. The binding of calcium to the protein, troponin-c, initiates a series of steps that lead to muscle contraction. The binding of calcium to the protein, calmodulin, activates enzymes that breakdown muscle glycogen to provide energy for muscle contraction.

Cofactor for enzymes and proteins
Calcium is necessary to stabilize or allow for optimal activity of a number of proteins and enzymes. The binding of calcium ions is required for the activation of the seven “vitamin K-dependent” clotting factors in the coagulation cascade (see vitamin K). The term, “coagulation cascade,” refers to a series of events, each dependent on the other that stops bleeding through clot formation.

Regulation of calcium levels
Calcium concentrations in the blood and fluid that surrounds cells are tightly controlled in order to preserve normal physiological functioning.

Sign and Symptoms of Deficiency
A low blood calcium level usually implies abnormal parathyroid function, and is rarely due to low dietary calcium intake since the skeleton provides a large reserve of calcium for maintaining normal blood levels. Other causes of abnormally low blood calcium levels include chronic kidney failure, vitamin D deficiency, and low blood magnesium levels that occur mainly in cases of severe alcoholism. Magnesium deficiency results in a decrease in the responsiveness of osteoclasts to PTH. A chronically low calcium intake in growing individuals may prevent the attainment of optimal peak bone mass. Once peak bone mass is achieved, inadequate calcium intake may contribute to accelerated bone loss and ultimately the development of osteoporosis.

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